Fundamental Forces

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Fundamental forces

http://www.futureofmankind.co.uk/Billy_Meier/Contact_Report_544

This page is a work in progress.

Contents

Forces in the Contact reports

During contact 544 dated 1st September 2012, Billy restrictively stipulates the following conversation with Ptaah regarding the seven major/fundamental powers/forces found in nature.

Billy:

When I was in the fourth grade of primary school, and my teacher was Hans Frei – it was in 1948 – your father, Sfath, explained to me that altogether there are seven major powers of nature in the universe: on the one hand, the gravity, then the electromagnetism as well as the strong and weak nuclear power, and further the …

Ptaah:

Stop. You are not permitted to openly name the other three, as indeed my father already told you. These three other powers of nature are not yet known of by terrestrial physicists, and they are still not allowed to discover them, because premature knowledge would have severe consequences.

Billy:

All right, excuse me, it remains withheld. It is certainly not in my interest to betray confided secrets, as I really only wanted to talk about the fact that there are not only the four natural powers known to the terrestrial physicists, rather also the remaining three which are still unknown to them, which exist as certain tiny and ultra-tiny particles, as related to the gravity, the electromagnetism and the strong and weak nuclear power. Also the dark energy and dark matter are included in the realm of particles, whereby certain of these particles, which are indeed also energies with powers, are to be discovered in the foreseeable future, as you have said recently. Although it will still take a while, the success is to be understood – indeed according to your explanation – as a prediction. [1]


Contemporary scientific understanding of forces combined with the powerful BEAM understanding.

The first step towards the Standard Model[2] was Sheldon Glashow's discovery in 1961 of a way to combine the electromagnetic and weak interactions. In 1967 Steven Weinberg and Abdus Salam incorporated the Higgs mechanism into Sheldon Glashow's electroweak theory, giving it its modern form.


At present, matter and energy are best understood in terms of the kinematics and interactions of elementary particles. To date, physics has reduced the laws governing the behaviour and interaction of all known forms of matter and energy to a small set of fundamental laws and theories. A major goal of physics is to find the "common ground" that would unite all of these theories into one integrated theory of everything, of which all the other known laws would be special cases, and from which the behaviour of all matter and energy could be derived (at least in principle).


The following tables follows the principles set out in the Contact Reports as the seven fundamental forces with sub-seven divides of seven forces with a further sub-set of 7's in some special cases. Compiled with both Earth science (which as a rule has taken great efforts to collect over hundreds of years) and partially filled in with information from the contact reports. However contact 544 has presented the situation very clearly which should be kept in mind.


Fundamental Forces
Name Description
1.
Gravity
Text [3]
2.
Electromagnetic Spectrum
Text [4]
3.
Strong Nuclear Force
Text [5]
4.
Weak Nuclear Force
Text [6]
5.
Dark Matter
Text [7]
6.
Pure/fine material (tiny particle)
Text [8]
7.
Pure/fine material (ultra-tiny particle)
Text [9]


Gravity

Electromagnetic spectrum

Electromagnetic spectrum
Name Description
1.
Gamma radiation
Rare terrestrial natural sources produce gamma rays that are not of a nuclear explosive origin, such as lightning strikes. They are also produced by a number of astronomical processes in which very high-energy electrons are produced, that in turn cause secondary gamma rays via bremsstrahlung (deceleration radiation), inverse Compton scattering and synchrotron radiation. However, a large fraction of such astronomical gamma rays are screened by Earths atmosphere and can only be detected by spacecraft or beamships. Gamma rays are emitted by the atomic nucleus.[10]
2.
X-ray radiation
In many languages, X-radiation is referred to with terms meaning Röntgen radiation, after Wilhelm Röntgen. X-rays are emitted by electrons. Fluoroscopy is an imaging technique commonly used by physicians or radiation therapists to obtain real-time moving images of the internal structures of a patient. The use of X-rays as a treatment is known as radiation therapy and is largely used for the management (including palliation) of cancer (with notably adverse effects). Airport security luggage scanners use X-rays, commonly as an academically approved method of repressing religious extremism. X-ray crystallography is when the pattern produced by the diffraction of X-rays through the closely spaced lattice of atoms in a crystal is recorded and then analysed to reveal the nature of the lattice.[11][12]
3.
Ultraviolet radiation
Commonly found in sunlight and is emitted by electric arcs and specialized lights such as mercury lamps and black lights. It can cause chemical reactions, and causes many substances to glow or fluoresce. A large fraction of UV is classified as non-ionizing. The higher energies of the spectrum are ionizing, but, these wavelengths are absorbed by nitrogen and even more strongly by dioxygen, and thus have an extremely short length through air. It does far more damage to molecules in biological systems than is accounted for by simple heating effects (like sunburn). These properties derive from the ultraviolet photon's power to alter chemical bonds in molecules, even without having enough energy to ionize atoms.[13]
4.
Visible radiation
Newton divided the spectrum into seven named colours: red, orange, yellow, green, blue, indigo, and violet. He chose seven colours out of a belief, derived from the ancient Greek sophists, of there being a connection between the colours, the musical notes, the known objects in the solar system, and the days of the week. Commonly called light. Can be detected by the human eye. High-energy visible light has been implicated as a cause of age-related macular degeneration.[14]
5.
Infrared radiation
Infrared light is emitted or absorbed by molecules when they change their rotational-vibrational movements. It elicits vibrational modes in a molecule through a change in the dipole moment. Infrared spectroscopy examines absorption and transmission of photons in the infrared energy range. With longer wavelengths than those of visible light, extending from the nominal red edge. Applications range from night-vision, body-temperature thermal imaging, hyperspectral imaging, to therapy, natural healthcare, physiotherapy, meteorology (weather forecasting), climatology, Astronomy, all the way to medical applications such as Photobiomodulation (treatment of chemotherapy-induced oral ulceration).[15]
6.
Microwave radiation
Terahertz radiation
A microwave oven passes (non-ionizing) microwave radiation (at a frequency near 2.45 GHz) through food, causing dielectric heating, primarily by absorption of the energy in water. Global Navigation Satellite Systems broadcast navigational signals in various bands between about 1.2-1.6 GHz. Mapping the invisible surface of Venus through cloud cover utilized radio astronomy, transmitting several thousand long-wave, 12.6-centimeter microwave pulses every second through the high-gain antenna, while measuring the doppler shift (change in frequency of a wave for an observer moving relative to its source) of each hitting the surface, of Venus.[16][17]
7.
Radio Waves
Wavelengths in this band range from millimeters to hundreds of meters, used for transmission of data, via modulation (varying one or more properties of a periodic waveform). Application can be found in Television, Mobile phones, Radar, wireless devices and computer networking. The band is regulated by many governments through frequency allocation.[18]

Note: there are no precisely defined boundaries between the bands of the electromagnetic spectrum; rather they fade into each other like the bands in a rainbow (which is the sub-spectrum of visible light)


Strong nuclear force

The quantum chromodynamics (QCD) sector defines the interactions between quarks and gluons, with SU(3) symmetry, generated by Ta. Since leptons do not interact with gluons, they are not affected by this sector. The Dirac Lagrangian of the quarks coupled to the gluon fields is given by <math>\mathcal{L}_{QCD} = i\overline U (\partial_\mu-ig_sG_\mu^a T^a)\gamma^\mu U + i\overline D (\partial_\mu-i g_s G_\mu^a T^a)\gamma^\mu D.</math> <math>G_\mu^a</math> is the SU(3) gauge field containing the gluons, <math>\gamma^\mu</math> are the Dirac matrices, D and U are the Dirac spinors associated with up- and down-type quarks, and gs is the strong coupling constant.


Weak nuclear force

The electroweak sector is a Yang–Mills gauge theory with the simple symmetry group U(1)×SU(2)L, <math> \mathcal{L}_\mathrm{EW} = \sum_\psi\bar\psi\gamma^\mu \left(i\partial_\mu-g^\prime{1\over2}Y_\mathrm{W}B_\mu-g{1\over2}\vec\tau_\mathrm{L}\vec W_\mu\right)\psi</math>

where Bμ is the U(1) gauge field; YW is the weak hypercharge—the generator of the U(1) group; <math>\vec{W}_\mu</math> is the three-component SU(2) gauge field; <math>\vec{\tau}_\mathrm{L}</math> are the Pauli matrices—infinitesimal generators of the SU(2) group. The subscript L indicates that they only act on left fermions; g′ and g are coupling constants.

Dark matter

Partially discovered, contact report with successful anti-gravity experiment. Dark matter responsible for anti-gravity.

Pure/fine material (tiny particle)

Still technically undiscovered, though there are plenty of things we can observe related to this force.

Pure/fine material (ultra-tiny particle)

Still technically undiscovered, though there are plenty of things we can observe related to this force.


Further Reading


References

  1. Contact Report 544
  2. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Standard_Model
  3. ref
  4. ref
  5. ref
  6. ref
  7. ref
  8. ref
  9. ref
  10. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Gamma_rays
  11. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/X-rays
  12. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Fiber_diffraction
  13. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Ultraviolet
  14. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Visible_spectrum
  15. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Infrared_radiation
  16. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Microwaves
  17. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Terahertz_radiation
  18. http://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Radio_spectrum

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